A Travellerspoint blog

Port Arthur Shakedown

March Long Weekend

Once again we headed for Port Arthur on Friday night for a shakedown trip prior to going away in May - this has become a regular event to ensure that all is well with the Navara and the Fifth Wheeler. This year we had our grandchildren Bronte and Josh with us as Michelle and Craig were going to Melbourne for the weekend. After picking up the kids from school we headed for the Port Arthur Caravan Park at Garden Point arriving at about 6:00 pm with an hour or so of daylight left to set up camp.

While Di and I did a full set up the van with awning and mats, Bronte and Josh pitched their two-person tent. After dinner we lit the fire with some firewood that we brought with us - much cheaper than buying firewood at the caravan park, and Bronte and Josh got out the marshmallows to toast on the fire.

Bronte and Josh's tent at Port Arthur

Bronte and Josh's tent at Port Arthur

Toasting marshmallows on the fire

Toasting marshmallows on the fire

Di with Bronte and Josh enjoying the fire

Di with Bronte and Josh enjoying the fire

An early morning visitor

An early morning visitor

Our camp site

Our camp site

On Saturday afternoon we all did Rob Pennicott's Tasman Island Cruise from Port Arthur to Eagle Hawk Neck. While Di and I had done the Bruny Island Cruise, this cruise had more spectacular scenery and lots of seals, dolphins, and albatross. The cruise starts at Stewarts Bay near Port Arthur and finishes at Eagle Hawk Neck.

The Tasman Island cruise boat about to load passengers

The Tasman Island cruise boat about to load passengers

Bronte checking out the cormorants

Bronte checking out the cormorants

Cormorants on a rock shelf

Cormorants on a rock shelf

A sea eagle's nest

A sea eagle's nest

A pair of white breasted sea eagles

A pair of white breasted sea eagles

Waves breaking in a sea cave

Waves breaking in a sea cave

Sedimentary rock cliff-face

Sedimentary rock cliff-face

Another sea cave

Another sea cave

A three metre swell breaking on the rocks

A three metre swell breaking on the rocks

Dolerite cliffs

Dolerite cliffs

A wave breaking in a sea cave

A wave breaking in a sea cave

Tasman Island under low cloud

Tasman Island under low cloud

Southern end of Tasman Island

Southern end of Tasman Island

Albatross making a pass

Albatross making a pass

Tasman Island landing stage, flying fox and haulage way

Tasman Island landing stage, flying fox and haulage way

A seal enjoying a shower

A seal enjoying a shower

Drowned Sea Cave

Drowned Sea Cave

Cape Pillar

Cape Pillar

A wave breaking in Drowned Sea Cave

A wave breaking in Drowned Sea Cave

The Totem Pole at Cape Huay

The Totem Pole at Cape Huay

The Candle Stick at Cape Huay

The Candle Stick at Cape Huay

A playful Dolphin

A playful Dolphin

A sea cave at Eagle Hawk Neck

A sea cave at Eagle Hawk Neck

Inside the sea cave

Inside the sea cave

Tasman Arch from the water

Tasman Arch from the water

Sea Cave at Eagle Hawk Neck

Sea Cave at Eagle Hawk Neck

On Monday we met Craig and Michelle at the Dunalley Pub so as to return Bronte and Josh to their rightful owners. We were joined by Paul and Lee Chapman who spent the weekend at Port Arthur, and Brendan and Lyn Scarr who spent the weekend at Connelleys Marsh. We all had excellent meals and it was just as well that we had booked a table as the Pub was packed - even turning people away. After lunch Di and I returned home to get some missing pieces for the satellite dish so we could watch some TV as the local free to air has poor reception in the caravan park. We also collected more fire wood to keep us going for the rest of the week.

On Thursday Di and I went to Safety Cove to try a bit of fishing, but no luck!

Di on the beach at Safety Cove

Di on the beach at Safety Cove

Tasman Island in the distance

Tasman Island in the distance

Looking north from Safety Cove

Looking north from Safety Cove

On Friday we drove to Fortescue Bay intending to walk part of the Cape Huay Track, which had been upgraded last year. The track climbs almost 200 metres and includes a few thousand steps, which are very tiring. We made it to the highest point on the track which was about half way and enjoyed having our lunch with spectacular views. Having spent an hour getting to that point we decided that the rest of the walk could wait until next year.

The Cape Huay Track - 4 kms and 4 hours return

The Cape Huay Track - 4 kms and 4 hours return

The Fortescue Bay boat ramp from the start of the Cape Huay track

The Fortescue Bay boat ramp from the start of the Cape Huay track

Canoe Bay from the Cape Huay Track

Canoe Bay from the Cape Huay Track

Di on the Cape Huay Track

Di on the Cape Huay Track

Cape Huay from the highest point on the Cape Huay Track

Cape Huay from the highest point on the Cape Huay Track

The highest point on the Cape Huay Track

The highest point on the Cape Huay Track

Looking across Fortescue Bay from the Cape Huay Track

Looking across Fortescue Bay from the Cape Huay Track

Posted by TwoAces 17:24

Email this entryFacebookStumbleUpon

Table of contents

Be the first to comment on this entry.

This blog requires you to be a logged in member of Travellerspoint to place comments.

Login