A Travellerspoint blog

Day 31 - Tuesday 5 June 2012

Hyden

After breakfast we donned the walking boots and prepared for a full day doing the tourist things around Wave Rock. Wave Rock is a granite outcrop formed about 120 million years ago and since shaped by erosion to look like a breaking wave.

Di at Wave Rock

Di at Wave Rock

Wave Rock forms part of Hyden Rock, and we climbed to the top of the Rock to admire the view of the surrounding countryside. A low wall has been built almost all the way around the rock to collect fresh water when it rains and channel the water into a dam that provides Hyden with its fresh water supply. Not sure that the greenies would let them do that now!

View from the top of Hyden Rock looking towards The Humps

View from the top of Hyden Rock looking towards The Humps

Di with a new hat

Di with a new hat

Walls around the rock to trap fresh water

Walls around the rock to trap fresh water

Hyden's reservoir

Hyden's reservoir

Our next stop was a large rock formation at the base of Hyden Rock known as the Hippo's Yawn for obvious reasons - see the photo below.

The Hyppo's Yawn

The Hyppo's Yawn

From the Hyppo's Yawn we continued across a salt lake to the newly constructed Wave Rock Resort, which it is hoped will bring more tourists to the Rock.

Wave Rock Resort

Wave Rock Resort

The beach on the lake at the Wave Rock Resort

The beach on the lake at the Wave Rock Resort

The area is part of the WA wheat belt, and because of land clearing to grow more and more wheat the wheat belt has lost about 11% of its area to salt pans. The local farmers now understand the problem and are engaged on a tree planting campaign to lower the water table and reduce the impact of salt. It is estimated that 30 % of the wheat belt will be lost to salt before an equilibrium is obtained. A harsh lesson learned from excessive land clearing.

Salt damage near Wave Rock

Salt damage near Wave Rock

A farmer's fence through the salt pan

A farmer's fence through the salt pan

On the way back to the caravan park we passed the local airport that services the resort.

Wave Rock Resort Airport

Wave Rock Resort Airport

Back at the caravan park we checked out the local souvenir shop before visiting downtown Hyden for a trip to the bank for a bit of cash before buying some papers at the local IGA supermarket. We were surprised to see a NAB sign in the town - it turned out to be a sub-branch of the NAB Branch at Kondinin - 60 kms away. No ATM and no computer link to the NAB banking system, but they still gave us a cash advance. The NAB seem to have a good network in WA - Kurly and Frosty please note!

The NAB at Hyden

The NAB at Hyden

We continued on to The Humps, another rock formation that includes Mulka's Cave, the Kalari Trail, and the Gnamma Trail. Aboriginal legend has it that Mulka was born illegimate and as punishment he was cross-eyed and could not throw a spear to hunt. He was reputed to be very tall and would abduct young children at night to eat them. His hand prints in the cave are much higher than other aboriginals, and the moral of the story is that young children should not wander off at night or Mulka will get them.

Mulka's Cave

Mulka's Cave

Aboriginal hand prints in Mulka's Cave

Aboriginal hand prints in Mulka's Cave

From the Cave we made our way to the top of The Humps via the Kalari Trail that follows a fairly steep climb to the Peak before coming down the other side. There was an outstanding view from the top. But it was quite cold and windy.

The Humps

The Humps

Life on the Rock

Life on the Rock

Wanna-be wave on the Humps

Wanna-be wave on the Humps

View from the top of The Humps

View from the top of The Humps

Who's that over there?

Who's that over there?

After climbing to the top of the Humps, we followed the Gnamma trail on a shorter easier walk. Gnammas are water holes in the rocks that were expanded and looked after by the aborigines, to provide almost permanent water supplies.

Aboriginal water hole, or Gnamma

Aboriginal water hole, or Gnamma

A larger shallower water hole

A larger shallower water hole

Aboriginal lizard trap

Aboriginal lizard trap

Back at the caravan park we settled back with a QLD as a well deserved reward for our walk of about 10 kms all up.

White Gum tree on the road back to camp

White Gum tree on the road back to camp

Posted by TwoAces 04:57

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