A Travellerspoint blog

Day 42 - Saturday 16 June 2012

Margaret River

We had a foggy start to the day but it cleared to a generally clear blue sky. While David drove into Margaret River for the weekend papers Di did a couple of loads of washing. After lunch we drove to Cape Leeuwin to have a look at the lighthouse. The lighthouse was completed in 1896 and until 1982 the lens was rotated by a clockwork mechanism, and the beacon was a pressure kerosine mantle type lamp. The lighthouse now has a 1,000 watt tungsten lamp flashing every 7.5 seconds that can be seen 47 kms away. The lighthouse was maintained by 3 lightkeepers who resided in the lightkeepers cottages until 1988, the last lightkeeper to live at Cape Leeuwin leaving in 1998.

Cape Leeuwin was named by Matthew Flinders in 1801, at the commencement of his circumnavigation of Terra Australis, taking the name from the adjoining area that had been named Leeuwin's Land by Dutch navigators when the the "Leeuwin' rounded the Cape in 1622. Cape Leeuwin is regarded by mariners as one of the most treacherous coastlines in the world and marks the point where the Southern Ocean meets the Indian Ocean. In 1945 10 RAN sailors were lost overboard in a storm from HMAS Nizam when it was 11 miles off Cape Leeuwin on a voyage from Port Phillip Bay to Fremantle - the 10 sailors were never found.

Di admiring the view at Cape Leeuwin

Di admiring the view at Cape Leeuwin

The Lightkeeper's Cottages

The Lightkeeper's Cottages

The Cape Leeuwin Lighthouse

The Cape Leeuwin Lighthouse

The Southern Ocean

The Southern Ocean

The junction of the Southern Ocean and the Indian Ocean

The junction of the Southern Ocean and the Indian Ocean

The Indian Ocean

The Indian Ocean

After a coffee and a biscuit in the Lighthouse Tearooms, we moved on to have a look at Lake Cave. Lake Cave is one of more than 100 limestone caves located on the spine of the Leeuwin Naturaliste Ridge that runs from Dunsborough in the north to Augusta in the south. The cave entrance is located in a large hole created about 700 years ago when the roof of the cave collapsed. Lake Cave is located more than 200 metres underground and is accessible by a long staircase - the bad news is that you have to climb back out again. There is a fresh water lake at the bottom of the cave that being slightly acidic has shaped some of the formations, including the Suspended Table that is now some 40 cms above the lake level.

Stairs down to the cave entrance

Stairs down to the cave entrance

Old Karri Trees

Old Karri Trees

The Cave Entrance

The Cave Entrance

The Suspended Table

The Suspended Table

A Column and a Pillar

A Column and a Pillar

The Sphinx

The Sphinx

Suspended Table reflected in the lake

Suspended Table reflected in the lake

Posted by TwoAces 18:22

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